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Notable Quotable # 111

The beet is the most intense of vegetables. The radish, admittedly, is more feverish, but the fire of the radish is a cold fire, the fire of discontent not of passion. Tomatoes are lusty enough, yet there runs through tomatoes and undercurrent of frivolity. Beets are deadly serious.

  • Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins, pg. 1 (first sentences of the book)jitterbug perfume
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Notable Quotable # 109

Rosewater had a tremendous collection of science-fiction paperbacks under his bed. He had brought them to the hospital in a steamer trunk. Those beloved, frumpish books gave off a smell that permeated the ward – like flannel pajamas that hadn’t been changed for a month, or like Irish stew.

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Notable Quotable # 108

The dog, who had sounded so ferocious in the winter distances, was a female German shepherd. She was shivering. Her tail was between her legs. She had been borrowed that morning from a farmer. She had never been to war before. She had no idea what game was being played. Her name was Princess.

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Notable Quotable # 107

The second thing i thought was that I knew everything. Lettie Hempstock’s ocean flowed inside me, and it filled the entire universe, from Egg to Rose. I knew that. I knew what Egg was – where the universe began, to the sound of uncreated voices singing in the void – and i knew where Rose was – the peculiar crinkling of space on space into dimensions that fold like origami and blossom like strange orchids, and which would mark the last good time before the eventual end of everything and the next Big Bang, which would be, I knew now, nothing of the kind.

  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman, pg. 195-196

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Notable Quotable # 106

I liked myths. They weren’t adult stories and they weren’t children’s stories. They were better than that. They just were. Adult stories never made sense, and they were slow to start. They made me feel like there were secrets, masonic, mythic secrets to adulthood. Why didn’t adults want to read about Narnia, about secret islands and smugglers and dangerous fairies?

  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman, pg. 71-72neil-gaiman-the-ocean-at-the-end-of-the-lane-book-cover