Adventures in Etymology: Immolate

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Immolate

Fire-girl

Reason for Adventure

The word “immolating” was used twice in one chapter of Unholy Magic by Stacia Kane to describe two very different actions.

Dictionary.com Definitions/Origins

Form:
verb (used with object)
Definition:
1. to sacrifice.
2. to kill as a sacrificial victim, as by fire; offer in sacrifice.
3. to destroy by fire.
Origin:
1540–50;  < Latin immolātus,  past participle of immolāre  to sprinkle with holy meal prior to sacrificing,
sacrifice, equivalent to im- im- + mol ( a ) sacrificial barley cake, literally, millstone (see mill) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms:
Im·mo·lat·ed
Im·mo·lat·ing
Im·mo·la·tor, noun
Un·im·mo·lat·ed, adjective

Source:
immolating. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved April 02, 2013, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/immolating

Online Etymology Dictionary Information

immolate (v.)1540s, “to sacrifice, kill as a victim,” from Latin immolatus, past participle of immolare “to sacrifice,” originally “to sprinkle with sacrificial meal,” from assimilated form ofin- “into, in, on, upon” (see in- (2)) + mola (salsa) “(sacrificial) meal,” related to molere “to grind” (see mallet). Related: Immolated; immolating.

immolation (n.) early 15c., “a sacrificing” (originally especially with reference to Christ), from Middle French immolation (13c.) or directly from Latin immolationem (nominativeimmolatio) “a sacrificing,” noun of action from past participle stem of immolare (see immolate).

Sources:
Harper, D. (2012). Online etymology dictionary. Retrieved April 3, 2013 from http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=immolate&allowed_in_frame=0

Harper, D. (2012). Online etymology dictionary. Retrieved April 3, 2013 from http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=immolation&allowed_in_frame=0