The Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination go to Uranus!!!!

It comes to the point in every tragic saga of movies/books/TV shows etc. when the creators have obviously run out of ideas and flog one last installment with a truly terrible pun title which could’ve been brainstormed by a 10-year-old….. *cough*….

The Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination go to Uranus!!!!

Code Noir by Marianne De Pierres

Even more exciting, engaging and confusing then the first Parrish Plessis book which together made it more addictive. This series is a unique Australian Sci Fi, with a strong, vaguely terrifying heroine, that’s worth a read, even if at times it does your head in.

Raisins and Almonds by Kerry Greenwood

A very entertaining an informative Phryne Fisher book. Explores Judaism in 1920s Melbourne, Zionism, and alchemy and has a very ingenious ‘murder weapon’. I’m a fan of all the Phryne books that I’ve read so far and would recommend them to anyone who likes a sassy, stylish female detective, and mysteries with a ton of class :).

City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare

Another fun, exciting and intense book in the Mortal Instruments series. Further plot and character development drew me in and the action made be keep reading well after I should have put it down to get some shut-eye. It’s easy to see why this series is so popular, especially with teens/young adults and I wouldn’t be surprised if it was turned into the next big blockbuster movie franchise. I for one would welcome it more than I did the Twilight saga!

The Raven’s Heart by Jesse Blackadder

An amazing historical epic, especially for the author’s debut. Historical and fictional elements blended seamlessly into a very engaging story which twisted and turned like a raging river. The characters, especially Alison/Robert were intriguing, raw and deeply flawed which made them very believable. A tale of family secrets, power, betrayal and secret love but also a frank exploration of blood-soaked Scotland during the rule of the beautiful Mary, Queen of Scots.

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Amazing. The epitome of the rambling epic but also a book that transcends the genre – part mythic fantasy, part road trip story, part murder mystery, part thoughtful examination of America and humankind’s changing values, plus a bunch of other elements twisted together to make a Frankenstein patchwork quilt of awesomeness. A book that I had to digest in small bites over time (16 weeks in fact) because it was like a big nourishing meal for the mind that you don’t want to end. Recommended for lovers of mythology, coin tricks, con jobs, the addictive voice of Neil Gaiman or anyone who wants a unique and insightful read.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

An insightful and important classic. Some of the language and themes are hard to stomach in this day and age but ultimately that makes the novel even more poignant. Even though there has been a lot of controversy regarding the use of the N word and so it has been removed from some schools, I think all kids should read it so they can see the prejudice and bigotry that was so prominent in the past and how in some ways society has grown but in others these evils still exist.

City of Glass by Cassandra Clare

A very exciting end to a fun trilogy…except the trilogy is now 5 books long O.o Not sure where it will go because City of Glass was so final and climatic, but as long as there’s still demon hunting, interesting looking faerie folk and funny dialogue I’ll be happy 🙂

So that was my final set of Forgotten Reviews, however in the meantime I have amassed a few more reviews, mainly ones which don’t really warrant a full-size one, plus I have really enjoyed writing these Micro Review posts and you, my clever and beautiful Bookbaggers seem to like them (in fact thanks to the first three posts I’ve received a couple of extra likes and followers which is always nice :)) so I have a question to pose to you all:

Should I continue writing Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination posts on a semi-regular basis (i.e. once a month or after I’ve amassed a list of 5 or so)?

My current idea (which I decided upon with advice from my best friend, Sarah :)) Is that I will do Micro Reviews for some of my reads that don’t really require a full review, and then do a full one for books that I think need expanding upon. For example I currently have a backlog of around 10 reviews, but since a lot of them are shorter books only about 4 or 5 of those really need the space of a large review and the others would be perfectly content sharing a Micro Reviews post.

As I like to get the opinion of my readers (coz its you that I write for after all) I thought I’d put it to you in a little poll:

The poll closes in a month so you have plenty of time to vote – and I’ll probably remind (*cough* pester *cough*) you all a few times before then.

I hope all my beloved Bookbaggers had a lovely holiday season, whatever you happen to celebrate (or not celebrate as the case may be) and as always:

Happy Reading! 😀

Invasion of the Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination!

So, hey, hello there, I’m alive!

Some of you may have noticed that my posts have been kind of…..nonexistent for a while besides the Save The Words Saturday posts which loyally appear every lazy Saturday not because I have no life and blog every Saturday, but because I write them in bulk and schedule them for every Saturday. True Story.

Anyway, because I’ve been so busy finishing my Diploma then working (blah blah blah lazy blogger excuses :P) I have not only been neglecting my blogger duties but I also haven’t been reading as much as usual and so haven’t finished any books for ages, which in turn gives me less reason to blog – its a crazy cycle of doom! Part of the cycle is the longer I’m procrastinating or preoccupied the longer the gap is between reading a book and trying to write a review, and that makes for a really hard review writing process and probably a crappy review.

Because my loyal Bookbaggers don’t deserve sub par reviews I decided a while back not to write any of the ones that have piled up and only the ones that I had just finished and posted a list of the “Forgotten Reviews” in case any of you particularly wanted to know what I thought of any of them. Because the ones I had only just finished at the time never got done they formed an imaginary pile of dead reviews on top of the old pile which became a steaming pile of shame and remorse in my saved drafts which is not very fun O.o

So I have made a decision which will protect me from the festering pile while also giving a a fragment of satisfaction to any Bookbaggers who want a review, such as the mysterious commentor known only as “ehm” who commented on my Currently Reading page saying she would wait for my review of American Gods by Neil Gaiman (oops, sorry ehm, I finished American Gods in May and never wrote your review >.<).

Introducing…..

The Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination!!!!

Here I will do a series of short reviews (only a few choice sentences) that encapsulate my feelings for each book that became lost on the Forgotten Reviews pile of shame! I’m including all the original Forgotten Reviews as well as the newest members: Code Noir by Marianne De Pierres; Raisins and Almonds by Kerry Greenwood; City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare; The Raven’s Heart by Jesse Blackadder; American Gods by Neil Gaiman; To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee; and City of Glass by Cassandra Clare.

Because there are….holy crap 22(!) all up, I’m just going to do a few to begin with in this post and then follow up with continuing adventures of The Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination (or sequels if you will). My regular full-length reviews will start up again with Still Life With Woodpecker by Tom Robbins which I recently finished.

So without further ado I present the first installment:

Invasion of the Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination!!!!!!!!

(Now with twice the exclamation points for twice the emphasis!!!!!!!!)

The Eddie Dickens Trilogy By Philip Ardagh

Awful End

Eddie Dickens’ parent are ill with a disease that turns them crinkly around the edges and makes them smell like old hot water bottles so he must live with his Mad Uncle Jack and Even Madder Aunt Maud. As they are quite mad chaos and hilarity ensues in their trip back to Awful End (where Mad Uncle Jack and Even Madder Aunt Maud reside). A clever and really funny kids book that pokes fun at old English books and the English language in general in a way that acknowledges kids’ intelligence.

Dreadful Acts

Eddie is now living peacefully in Awful End with his mad Aunt and Uncle and Mother and Father (who recovered from their malady but not their insanity). This however doesn’t last for long as he ends up being privy to a escape artists trick gone wrong, falls for a woman with a face like a camel and accidentally gets kidnapped by a band of escaped convicts. More crazy, hilarious hijinks but perhaps not as great as Awful End.

Terrible Times

Poor Eddie has been enlisted to work at the family newspaper (which he never knew existed), Terrible Times and must travel to America aboard a leaky and otherwise highly hazardous boat, The Pompous Pig. Along the way he faces some old foes and new foes and almost certain death. Still very clever and amusing but my least favorite of the trilogy.


Coldheart Canyon
by Clive Barker

Amazing, disgusting, incredibly weird and disturbing but also a fantastic read. Explores the extremes of Hollywood, especially regarding image and staying young, but in classic Barker style also unearths dark mythologies which include graphic sexual perversions and lots of gore. Not for those with a weak constitution or stomach but highly recommended for seekers of a quality horror story as unique as it gets.


A Red Herring Without Mustard
by Alan Bradley

In the third Flavia De Luce mystery my favorite little poison-making detective helps out a mysterious and vaguely malevolent gypsy girl when her grandmother – an old fortune-teller that Flavia allowed to camp on her family’s land – is almost murdered. I love anything to do with gypsies and I always love the Flavia books so this was great fun. I especially liked how more back-story on Flavia’s family was revealed, especially regarding her late mother.

So there you go oh beloved Bookbaggers – not quite as long or as involved as my usual full-length reviews but didn’t a wise person once say “good things come in small packages”? I should find out where that saying comes from….

Keep your eyes peeled (and where does THAT saying comes from? Its actually really gross if you think about it…) for the continuing Micro Review invasions and other regular posting, but for now:

Happy Reading!

MIA March

Hello my dear Bookbaggers!

For those of you who keep track of new posts on Book Polygamist you have no doubt noticed that I have been quite absent this month.

In fact besides my Save The Words Saturday posts (which are set to a schedule and post automatically at noon every Saturday) I haven’t written a single post – not even my newest Top 10 which was due to go up early on, or a special post for Book Polygamist’s 1st anniversary on the 5th of March!

The reason for this is my preoccupation with three very different beasts:

  1. Study (I am nearing the end of the term and since I’m in the final semester of my Diploma it’s quite hairy)
  2. Work (I have picked up some extra hours at my college library as well as the occasional Saturday at Duncraig Library)
  3. Pokemon (I recently bought an old Nintendo Gameboy Advance SP and a bunch of games including Pokemon Ruby which is addictive retro fun :P)

My retro mistress

This has left me very little time to read and even less time to post, but as I will be on term break soon I will have a lot more time on my hands, and if I can ween myself off Pokemon for a bit I will endeavour to resume my regular posting, starting with the missing Top 10 lists, a couple of recent reviews and some tasty quotes 🙂

I have also made a decision that I hope will allow me to better balance study/work and blogging: I will not be writing the old reviews that have piled up.

While I would love to review some of the books I am aware that as it gets farther and farther away from when I read them I find it harder to remember and write a quality review, and the new books I finish just pile up on top of the old ones. I will post a list of the “forgotten reviews” and I welcome requests for a review of individuals in the list that take my readers’ fancy, but besides that I will carry on with recent reviews, starting with The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern.

The “forgotten reviews” are:

  • The Eddie Dickens Trilogy By Philip Ardagh
  • Coldheart Canyon By Clive Barker
  • A Red Herring Without Mustard By Alan Bradley
  • Monster Blood Tattoo Book 2: Lamplighter By D M Cornish
  • Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons
  • Trick or Treat By Kerry Greenwood
  • Adultery By Richard B Wright
  • The Girl Who Played With Fire By Stieg Larsson
  • V for Vendetta By Alan Moore and David Lloyd
  • The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle by Catherine Webb
  • The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh
  • Books of Blood Vol 1-3 By Clive Barker
  • Grave Sight By Charlaine Harris

Wow, now that I look at it I am both ashamed that I didn’t do so many and relieved that I decided against doing them all 😛

Feel free to request a review in the comments (please don’t request too many tho O.o) and stay tuned for regular posting around the 6th of April when I’m officially on break 🙂

Until then, Happy Reading!