The Micro Reviews From Planet Procrastination: Journey to the Blue(ish) Planet!

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Following our intrepid heroes’ thorough exploration of Uranus (snicker), the brave adventurers headed to the next stop on their tour of the Solar System – the gloriously blue Neptune. En route (which is French for “on the way” or “during the course of the Journey” and is completely redundant here as the Micro Reviews had never been to Earth’s France, or learned the language), all but one crew member decided to have a siesta (which is Spanish for “a little nap in the afternoon when the day is at its hottest”, which is also completely useless in this context as A. the Micro Reviews knew even less of Earth’s Spain then they did of its nearby neighbor  France; B. In space “afternoon” is not really existent; and C. It was perfectly climate controlled in the spaceship) and by a collective lapse in judgement (which happened fairly regularly) left the most incompetent crew member, Lieutenant Huh, at the helm.

Confident in the knowledge that the ship’s navigation system and auto-pilot had already been configured to their destination (a knowledge that was completely flawed as characteristically none of the crew members had actually gotten around to configuring the systems), Lieutenant Huh decided to take a nap also, Glark dammit! and gently rested his head upon the control panel. By another stroke of bad judgement and planning one of the most sensitive and dangerous controls – which opened up a compact wormhole for quick travel to far-off galaxies – had been placed front and centre on the control panel, with no labeling save a very tatty post-it note (the Micro Reviews had discovered this fascinating technology while undercover in an accounting company on Earth. Besides the post-it they had found no reason to continue their invasion recon as Earth offices were too boring even for them).  The Create Wormhole button (or Cre8 Wrmhol as it said on the post-it) had also been placed in the rather unfortunate area directly under  Lieutenant Huh’s face.

Upon waking from a very restorative nap, Huh found himself gazing at a large and brilliant blue planet, slowing getting larger and bluer as the ship approached it. He was quite pleased with himself. Obviously his nap had been quite productive and they had arrived at Neptune ahead of schedule! He was halfway through giving himself a hearty pat on the back with all six of his arms when he noticed something peculiar about the blue planet that was getting clearer by the second – it looked, well, a tad dead. From what he remembered about Neptune he wasn’t expecting a planet teeming with life – after all it was essentially a huge ball of frozen gases – but he certainly hadn’t expected a barren, decidedly un-frozen and un-gaseous wasteland of blue dirt with rather sinister looking black trees dotted about. He decided he should probably cease his back-patting, wake up his slumbering crew members, and investigate what the Hrak was wrong with Neptune and whether or not it was even Neptune at all…

And now for the reviews:

Dead and Gone by Charlaine Harris

Dead and Gone by Charlaine Harris

Another entertaining and addictive installment in the Sookie Stackhouse series. I especially enjoyed the “coming out” of the weres and the further development of fae in the series’ plot. The main mystery had a satisfactory amount of twists and red herrings but in the end i was a little let down by the final reveal. Besides this it was an enjoyable and quick read and I haven’t lost interest in the series yet 🙂

Blue by Pat Grant

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A beautifully illustrated, quintessentially Australian graphic novel that deals with some of our country’s serious issues of racism and localism. The artwork and story were deceptively simple  (whimsical line/ink drawings in black and white with touches of blue, and hand-drawn lettering, with the accompanying tale of a trio of  teenage surfers skipping school to investigate a dead body near the train tracks) but cut right to the heart of the issues in a very unique way. The graphic novel was paired with a series of short essays by the author on surfing culture, comics and the like.

The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories by Dr Seuss

The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories

A quality collection of Dr Seuss stories previously only published in magazines in the ’50s. Some are obviously beginnings of ideas which became classic Dr Seuss books (I’m sure I’ve read a full-length version of Gustav the Goldfish before, and The Strange Shirt Spot definitely inspired The Cat in the Hat Comes Back!) while others are completely new. My favourites were: the headlining The Bippolo Seed; and the hilarious fable, The Rabbit, the Bear and the Zinniga-Zanniga.

Curses and Blessings for All Occasions by Bradley Trevor Greive

curses and blessings

 

A highly giggle-worthy and witty humor/gift book. I like how Bradley Trevor Greive has shifted from the captioned animal photos of his previous books to funny little vintage drawings of animals that have been altered to match the text (in a similar vein as the Married to the Sea online comics which I adore) – it fits the subject matter like a glove. My favorite curses and blessings were: Blessing #3, 5, 13, 15 and 18; and Curse # 6, 7, 13, 21 and 22 😛 Now you have to read it to find out! MWAHAHAHA!

The Templeton Twins: Have An Idea by Ellis Weiner

the templeton twins have an idea

A very clever and amusing children’s adventure story. The narration, character and plot development were reminiscent of Lemony Snicket‘s Series of Unfortunate Events, which I loved so this was an enjoyable read. I especially loved the narrator, especially especially how he (or she?) explained words or concepts and the questions he (I’m almost certain its a he…) asked at the end of each chapter. The illustrations were also lovely, and I like the gray-scale and blue theme. I guessed all the twists before they occurred, but I am about 15 years older than the target audience, and I’m sure 9-13 year old me would’ve been kept guessing and loving every moment of it!

HUZZAH! There ends the first rebooted Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination!! What did you guys think? Let me know in the comments, or any other (legal and non-creepy) way you’d prefer to contact me 🙂

Until the continued adventures of the Micro Reviews returns I hope you have fun imagining what befalls them on the mysterious blue planet (here’s a hint: its much less sinister than it seems 😉 ) and as always:

Happy Reading!

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The Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination go to Uranus!!!!

It comes to the point in every tragic saga of movies/books/TV shows etc. when the creators have obviously run out of ideas and flog one last installment with a truly terrible pun title which could’ve been brainstormed by a 10-year-old….. *cough*….

The Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination go to Uranus!!!!

Code Noir by Marianne De Pierres

Even more exciting, engaging and confusing then the first Parrish Plessis book which together made it more addictive. This series is a unique Australian Sci Fi, with a strong, vaguely terrifying heroine, that’s worth a read, even if at times it does your head in.

Raisins and Almonds by Kerry Greenwood

A very entertaining an informative Phryne Fisher book. Explores Judaism in 1920s Melbourne, Zionism, and alchemy and has a very ingenious ‘murder weapon’. I’m a fan of all the Phryne books that I’ve read so far and would recommend them to anyone who likes a sassy, stylish female detective, and mysteries with a ton of class :).

City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare

Another fun, exciting and intense book in the Mortal Instruments series. Further plot and character development drew me in and the action made be keep reading well after I should have put it down to get some shut-eye. It’s easy to see why this series is so popular, especially with teens/young adults and I wouldn’t be surprised if it was turned into the next big blockbuster movie franchise. I for one would welcome it more than I did the Twilight saga!

The Raven’s Heart by Jesse Blackadder

An amazing historical epic, especially for the author’s debut. Historical and fictional elements blended seamlessly into a very engaging story which twisted and turned like a raging river. The characters, especially Alison/Robert were intriguing, raw and deeply flawed which made them very believable. A tale of family secrets, power, betrayal and secret love but also a frank exploration of blood-soaked Scotland during the rule of the beautiful Mary, Queen of Scots.

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

Amazing. The epitome of the rambling epic but also a book that transcends the genre – part mythic fantasy, part road trip story, part murder mystery, part thoughtful examination of America and humankind’s changing values, plus a bunch of other elements twisted together to make a Frankenstein patchwork quilt of awesomeness. A book that I had to digest in small bites over time (16 weeks in fact) because it was like a big nourishing meal for the mind that you don’t want to end. Recommended for lovers of mythology, coin tricks, con jobs, the addictive voice of Neil Gaiman or anyone who wants a unique and insightful read.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

An insightful and important classic. Some of the language and themes are hard to stomach in this day and age but ultimately that makes the novel even more poignant. Even though there has been a lot of controversy regarding the use of the N word and so it has been removed from some schools, I think all kids should read it so they can see the prejudice and bigotry that was so prominent in the past and how in some ways society has grown but in others these evils still exist.

City of Glass by Cassandra Clare

A very exciting end to a fun trilogy…except the trilogy is now 5 books long O.o Not sure where it will go because City of Glass was so final and climatic, but as long as there’s still demon hunting, interesting looking faerie folk and funny dialogue I’ll be happy 🙂

So that was my final set of Forgotten Reviews, however in the meantime I have amassed a few more reviews, mainly ones which don’t really warrant a full-size one, plus I have really enjoyed writing these Micro Review posts and you, my clever and beautiful Bookbaggers seem to like them (in fact thanks to the first three posts I’ve received a couple of extra likes and followers which is always nice :)) so I have a question to pose to you all:

Should I continue writing Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination posts on a semi-regular basis (i.e. once a month or after I’ve amassed a list of 5 or so)?

My current idea (which I decided upon with advice from my best friend, Sarah :)) Is that I will do Micro Reviews for some of my reads that don’t really require a full review, and then do a full one for books that I think need expanding upon. For example I currently have a backlog of around 10 reviews, but since a lot of them are shorter books only about 4 or 5 of those really need the space of a large review and the others would be perfectly content sharing a Micro Reviews post.

As I like to get the opinion of my readers (coz its you that I write for after all) I thought I’d put it to you in a little poll:

The poll closes in a month so you have plenty of time to vote – and I’ll probably remind (*cough* pester *cough*) you all a few times before then.

I hope all my beloved Bookbaggers had a lovely holiday season, whatever you happen to celebrate (or not celebrate as the case may be) and as always:

Happy Reading! 😀

Revenge of the Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination!!!

In this day and age a simple one-off book, movie or game has become old-hat, and a single sequel? Well that’s just passé! Why create just one or two works when you could release a grand Trilogy, Saga or Franchise into the world to wow generations and collect some extra coin? Sure the second sequel isn’t always a hit and with every new installment your original vision is watered down until it resembles a thin gruel, but on the other hand you may hit the magic point where a sequel surpasses its parent!

On that note, it is my pleasure to introduce a hopefully successful and non-gruely installment of the Micro Reviews Saga:

Revenge of the Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination!!!

Monster Blood Tattoo Book 2: Lamplighter By D M Cornish

Took me ages to finish as the story is so involved and the world is so intricate, but if you persevere it is a great second installment to a very unique trilogy. A good trilogy for children and young adults that enjoy fantasy worlds that they can really sink their teeth into, but would probably only hold the attention of kids that like a lot of detail. Prepare yourself for endless checking of the glossary and other appendices.

Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons

A graphic novel that exceeds the form and a super hero comic which is unlike any super hero comic (or at least any I’ve read). Complex, intense and brilliant. Possibly not the best Graphic Novel to test the waters of the format (just like V for Vendetta) but one that will please Graphic Novel lovers.

Trick or Treat By Kerry Greenwood

Another fun Corinna Chapmen book. This one had Earthly Delights, Corrina’s beloved bakery, almost closing down, people drugged/poisoned with cakes, a Nazi Gold mystery and some suspicious witches. Not my fave so far, but still a treat, not a trick.

Adultery By Richard B Wright

Not exactly what I expected (certainly not a Mystery like the library spine label suggested) but a good read nonetheless. An exploration of grief and the consequences of ones choices – in this case the consequences of adultery is not simply hurting a spouse and loosing their trust, but the loss of a life and having to endure media attention and the grief of a family. There was so much more I wanted to know about the aftermath of the murder in this story, but it was still a cleverly simple book that was quite engaging.

The Girl Who Played With Fire By Stieg Larsson

As with the first Millennium book, this was hard to get into but once I did it was a wild ride! I was a bit disappointed with the ending as it didn’t wrap everything up like the ending of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo but I guess that’s because it continues into the next book. I can’t say much without giving important plot points away, but this series is worth a read if you enjoy a fast-paced thriller with complex, interesting characters.

So the Micro Reviews have had their sweet, sweet revenge! Will they be back once again?! Well all I can say is I only have one more planned (which finishes off the pile of Forgotten Reviews) but if there is enough demand I may make it a regular feature, kind of “reviews lite” for people who want to have a quick look at my recent reviews before (or instead of) reading the full-length ones.

What do you think? Do you Bookbaggers enjoy the Micro Reviews from Planet Procrastination or do you prefer just the regular reviews? Feel free to sound off in the comments 🙂

Happy Reading!